Story by Megan Whitehead | Jun 27, 2016
Photography by Keith Borgmeyer

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Terry Imhoff, Resident Engineer

 

Do you have a nickname? If so, is there a story behind the name?

T-Bob is my most commonly used nickname and is a short version of my real name, Terry Robert. Cotton is another nickname because I have blonde hair. I’ve had both nicknames since I was a kid.

What is your title and name of organization where you work?

I am the resident engineer for the Missouri Department of Transportation’s Jefferson City Project Office.

How long have you been in your current role?

I have been the resident engineer at the Jefferson City Project Office for almost 16 years.

Please list your former jobs and number of years/months in those positions.

I have worked at MoDOT since graduating from college in 1987. I worked for two years with the Columbia Project Office as a construction inspector and six years with the Jefferson City Project Office as a construction inspector. I also worked for five years with the Central District Design Division as the district utilities engineer. For the past 16 years, I’ve served as the resident engineer for the Jefferson City Project Office.

Please list your education:

I attended grade school and graduated from high school at California R-1. I have a Bachelor of Science in civil engineering from MU.

Why are the bridge repairs necessary and what all do they involve?

The bridge was constructed in 1955, and a structure that old requires rehabilitation in the same way a house or other building would. The paint applied to the structural steel protects it from rusting, and each paint system will only last for so long due to aging and the effects of the environment. Therefore, the structural steel has been blast cleaned and repainted to prevent costlier repairs. The salt that is applied on the roadways during winter storms also has an adverse effect on the structural steel and concrete of the bridge. In addition to repainting all of the bridge’s structural steel, concrete repairs will be performed on many of the bridge supports because of some deterioration due to salt.

Why the closing of lanes?

Closing the lanes provided the quickest, safest, and most cost-effective method of repainting and repairing the bridge. Also, because the project involves removing the old paint and applying new paint, the work must be performed in an enclosed setting to protect the environment.

How much will the project cost and what is the timeframe?

The contract cost is $7,099,777, and the contract completion date is June 1, 2017.

Why are the repairs being done now?

The maintenance work is necessary to maintain the bridge and extend its life for another 25 years or more. Major river bridges are a big investment in our system, and it’s important to maintain that investment. If not properly maintained, this bridge would cost $100 million to replace. Delaying these repairs would result in costlier repairs in the future.

What can motorists expect throughout the summer and fall?

The eastbound and westbound traffic will have two lanes in each direction on the outbound bridge until late August, depending on the contractor’s progress. Drivers should expect 10- to 20-minute delays during the morning and evening rush hours. Sometime in late August, the westbound bridge will re-open. Single lane drops will occur during non-peak traffic times for the westbound traffic, and the eastbound traffic will be restored to its original lane configuration.

When will the work be complete?

It is anticipated that this project will be completed in the spring or summer of 2017, although the westbound structure should reopen to traffic by the end of August.

What has been your greatest challenge throughout the bridge repairs?

Trying to juggle a bowling ball, a sledge hammer, a box of feathers, a log chain, a kid’s bicycle, and a cotton ball all at the same time.

What makes you most proud about this project?

Being able to juggle a bowling ball, a sledge hammer, a box of feathers, a log chain, a kid’s bicycle, and a cotton ball all at the same time.

Check out MoDOT’s video of the bridge repairs:

Inside the Westbound Missouri River Bridge Painting Project

The Route 54/63 Westbound Missouri River Bridge is covered for painting in Jefferson City! Want to know what's behind the tent? Take an inside look …

Posted by MoDOT Central Missouri District on Monday, July 11, 2016

 Originally posted on MoDOT’s facebook here.